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This Restaurant Gives Discounts for Well-Behaved Children

This Restaurant Gives Discounts for Well-Behaved Children

A restaurant in Padua, Italy, offers a five percent price break for families whose kids don’t make a scene

Someone must be fed up with tableside temper tantrums.

We’ve all experienced the unpleasantness of trying to enjoy a nice dinner out while a toddler screams at the next table. While some restaurants decide to go the extreme route by banning children, one restaurant in Padua, Italy is rewarding good behavior. If you bring a well-behaved child (that means no crying or throwing of utensils) to Antonio Ferrari, you’ll receive a five percent discount.

"When you get parents who are rude, the kids think they can do anything. They might climb on the tables with their shoes on, play in the bathroom and make a mess with the taps, or annoy the other customers," Ferrari told Fox News.

It all started with one family last week, whose children quietly sat and colored and did multiplication tables while the adults ate and chatted. Ferrari was so pleased with their behavior, that he implemented the surprise five percent discount. As a result, the family left an extra 30 Euro tip for their server.

Il titolare dell'enoteca che ha fatto lo sconto bimbi educati: «Guardarli era uno spettacolo» @Corriere https://t.co/ucJ5RttxWM

— Elvira Serra (@elvira_serra) February 14, 2017

Since the incident, Ferrari has extended his special discount to other families, but estimates that during the busy lunch hour, about 30 percent of parents are incapable of controlling their children.


Would Your Kids Be Well Behaved Enough for This Restaurant in Padua, Italy?

Good behavior at school may earn children a gold star, good behavior at home may earn kids five more minutes of playtime, but at Italian restaurateur Antonio Ferrari&aposs Padua wine bar, good behavior can knock five percent off a dinner bill. Ferrari got the idea to implement the discount, which appears on checks as a sconti bimbi educati, or "polite children discount," after dealing with a few too many ruckus-causing youngsters.

"I have seen five-year-olds put their feet on the table and four-year-olds jumping from chair to chair, while parents do nothing," Ferrari told the Times. "And when I complain the parents tell me ‘My children can do what they want&apos."

Ferrari first started adding the discount onto families&apos bills about six months ago but so far only awarded it to three families. It a grand total that he says goes to show just how rare good behavior is in his restaurant, where kids are more often found splashing water from the tap in the bathroom or running around waiters who are carrying plates to tables.

Even so, Ferrari does admit that since the implementation of the discount, he has felt a sense of calmness reenter his restaurant, which he says is incredibly important in maintaining the tranquil kind of ambiance that diners pay quite a bit to enjoy.

His reward-based approach for dealing with out-of-control young diners is quite different to tactics employed by other restaurateurs recently – namely, penalizing families for ill-mannered behavior by charging rude customers double or banning them from the establishment altogether. While it&aposs tough to say just which method is the most effective in keeping unruly behavior at bay, we&aposre hoping that giving families a little incentive will inspire better things.


Would Your Kids Be Well Behaved Enough for This Restaurant in Padua, Italy?

Good behavior at school may earn children a gold star, good behavior at home may earn kids five more minutes of playtime, but at Italian restaurateur Antonio Ferrari&aposs Padua wine bar, good behavior can knock five percent off a dinner bill. Ferrari got the idea to implement the discount, which appears on checks as a sconti bimbi educati, or "polite children discount," after dealing with a few too many ruckus-causing youngsters.

"I have seen five-year-olds put their feet on the table and four-year-olds jumping from chair to chair, while parents do nothing," Ferrari told the Times. "And when I complain the parents tell me ‘My children can do what they want&apos."

Ferrari first started adding the discount onto families&apos bills about six months ago but so far only awarded it to three families. It a grand total that he says goes to show just how rare good behavior is in his restaurant, where kids are more often found splashing water from the tap in the bathroom or running around waiters who are carrying plates to tables.

Even so, Ferrari does admit that since the implementation of the discount, he has felt a sense of calmness reenter his restaurant, which he says is incredibly important in maintaining the tranquil kind of ambiance that diners pay quite a bit to enjoy.

His reward-based approach for dealing with out-of-control young diners is quite different to tactics employed by other restaurateurs recently – namely, penalizing families for ill-mannered behavior by charging rude customers double or banning them from the establishment altogether. While it&aposs tough to say just which method is the most effective in keeping unruly behavior at bay, we&aposre hoping that giving families a little incentive will inspire better things.


Would Your Kids Be Well Behaved Enough for This Restaurant in Padua, Italy?

Good behavior at school may earn children a gold star, good behavior at home may earn kids five more minutes of playtime, but at Italian restaurateur Antonio Ferrari&aposs Padua wine bar, good behavior can knock five percent off a dinner bill. Ferrari got the idea to implement the discount, which appears on checks as a sconti bimbi educati, or "polite children discount," after dealing with a few too many ruckus-causing youngsters.

"I have seen five-year-olds put their feet on the table and four-year-olds jumping from chair to chair, while parents do nothing," Ferrari told the Times. "And when I complain the parents tell me ‘My children can do what they want&apos."

Ferrari first started adding the discount onto families&apos bills about six months ago but so far only awarded it to three families. It a grand total that he says goes to show just how rare good behavior is in his restaurant, where kids are more often found splashing water from the tap in the bathroom or running around waiters who are carrying plates to tables.

Even so, Ferrari does admit that since the implementation of the discount, he has felt a sense of calmness reenter his restaurant, which he says is incredibly important in maintaining the tranquil kind of ambiance that diners pay quite a bit to enjoy.

His reward-based approach for dealing with out-of-control young diners is quite different to tactics employed by other restaurateurs recently – namely, penalizing families for ill-mannered behavior by charging rude customers double or banning them from the establishment altogether. While it&aposs tough to say just which method is the most effective in keeping unruly behavior at bay, we&aposre hoping that giving families a little incentive will inspire better things.


Would Your Kids Be Well Behaved Enough for This Restaurant in Padua, Italy?

Good behavior at school may earn children a gold star, good behavior at home may earn kids five more minutes of playtime, but at Italian restaurateur Antonio Ferrari&aposs Padua wine bar, good behavior can knock five percent off a dinner bill. Ferrari got the idea to implement the discount, which appears on checks as a sconti bimbi educati, or "polite children discount," after dealing with a few too many ruckus-causing youngsters.

"I have seen five-year-olds put their feet on the table and four-year-olds jumping from chair to chair, while parents do nothing," Ferrari told the Times. "And when I complain the parents tell me ‘My children can do what they want&apos."

Ferrari first started adding the discount onto families&apos bills about six months ago but so far only awarded it to three families. It a grand total that he says goes to show just how rare good behavior is in his restaurant, where kids are more often found splashing water from the tap in the bathroom or running around waiters who are carrying plates to tables.

Even so, Ferrari does admit that since the implementation of the discount, he has felt a sense of calmness reenter his restaurant, which he says is incredibly important in maintaining the tranquil kind of ambiance that diners pay quite a bit to enjoy.

His reward-based approach for dealing with out-of-control young diners is quite different to tactics employed by other restaurateurs recently – namely, penalizing families for ill-mannered behavior by charging rude customers double or banning them from the establishment altogether. While it&aposs tough to say just which method is the most effective in keeping unruly behavior at bay, we&aposre hoping that giving families a little incentive will inspire better things.


Would Your Kids Be Well Behaved Enough for This Restaurant in Padua, Italy?

Good behavior at school may earn children a gold star, good behavior at home may earn kids five more minutes of playtime, but at Italian restaurateur Antonio Ferrari&aposs Padua wine bar, good behavior can knock five percent off a dinner bill. Ferrari got the idea to implement the discount, which appears on checks as a sconti bimbi educati, or "polite children discount," after dealing with a few too many ruckus-causing youngsters.

"I have seen five-year-olds put their feet on the table and four-year-olds jumping from chair to chair, while parents do nothing," Ferrari told the Times. "And when I complain the parents tell me ‘My children can do what they want&apos."

Ferrari first started adding the discount onto families&apos bills about six months ago but so far only awarded it to three families. It a grand total that he says goes to show just how rare good behavior is in his restaurant, where kids are more often found splashing water from the tap in the bathroom or running around waiters who are carrying plates to tables.

Even so, Ferrari does admit that since the implementation of the discount, he has felt a sense of calmness reenter his restaurant, which he says is incredibly important in maintaining the tranquil kind of ambiance that diners pay quite a bit to enjoy.

His reward-based approach for dealing with out-of-control young diners is quite different to tactics employed by other restaurateurs recently – namely, penalizing families for ill-mannered behavior by charging rude customers double or banning them from the establishment altogether. While it&aposs tough to say just which method is the most effective in keeping unruly behavior at bay, we&aposre hoping that giving families a little incentive will inspire better things.


Would Your Kids Be Well Behaved Enough for This Restaurant in Padua, Italy?

Good behavior at school may earn children a gold star, good behavior at home may earn kids five more minutes of playtime, but at Italian restaurateur Antonio Ferrari&aposs Padua wine bar, good behavior can knock five percent off a dinner bill. Ferrari got the idea to implement the discount, which appears on checks as a sconti bimbi educati, or "polite children discount," after dealing with a few too many ruckus-causing youngsters.

"I have seen five-year-olds put their feet on the table and four-year-olds jumping from chair to chair, while parents do nothing," Ferrari told the Times. "And when I complain the parents tell me ‘My children can do what they want&apos."

Ferrari first started adding the discount onto families&apos bills about six months ago but so far only awarded it to three families. It a grand total that he says goes to show just how rare good behavior is in his restaurant, where kids are more often found splashing water from the tap in the bathroom or running around waiters who are carrying plates to tables.

Even so, Ferrari does admit that since the implementation of the discount, he has felt a sense of calmness reenter his restaurant, which he says is incredibly important in maintaining the tranquil kind of ambiance that diners pay quite a bit to enjoy.

His reward-based approach for dealing with out-of-control young diners is quite different to tactics employed by other restaurateurs recently – namely, penalizing families for ill-mannered behavior by charging rude customers double or banning them from the establishment altogether. While it&aposs tough to say just which method is the most effective in keeping unruly behavior at bay, we&aposre hoping that giving families a little incentive will inspire better things.


Would Your Kids Be Well Behaved Enough for This Restaurant in Padua, Italy?

Good behavior at school may earn children a gold star, good behavior at home may earn kids five more minutes of playtime, but at Italian restaurateur Antonio Ferrari&aposs Padua wine bar, good behavior can knock five percent off a dinner bill. Ferrari got the idea to implement the discount, which appears on checks as a sconti bimbi educati, or "polite children discount," after dealing with a few too many ruckus-causing youngsters.

"I have seen five-year-olds put their feet on the table and four-year-olds jumping from chair to chair, while parents do nothing," Ferrari told the Times. "And when I complain the parents tell me ‘My children can do what they want&apos."

Ferrari first started adding the discount onto families&apos bills about six months ago but so far only awarded it to three families. It a grand total that he says goes to show just how rare good behavior is in his restaurant, where kids are more often found splashing water from the tap in the bathroom or running around waiters who are carrying plates to tables.

Even so, Ferrari does admit that since the implementation of the discount, he has felt a sense of calmness reenter his restaurant, which he says is incredibly important in maintaining the tranquil kind of ambiance that diners pay quite a bit to enjoy.

His reward-based approach for dealing with out-of-control young diners is quite different to tactics employed by other restaurateurs recently – namely, penalizing families for ill-mannered behavior by charging rude customers double or banning them from the establishment altogether. While it&aposs tough to say just which method is the most effective in keeping unruly behavior at bay, we&aposre hoping that giving families a little incentive will inspire better things.


Would Your Kids Be Well Behaved Enough for This Restaurant in Padua, Italy?

Good behavior at school may earn children a gold star, good behavior at home may earn kids five more minutes of playtime, but at Italian restaurateur Antonio Ferrari&aposs Padua wine bar, good behavior can knock five percent off a dinner bill. Ferrari got the idea to implement the discount, which appears on checks as a sconti bimbi educati, or "polite children discount," after dealing with a few too many ruckus-causing youngsters.

"I have seen five-year-olds put their feet on the table and four-year-olds jumping from chair to chair, while parents do nothing," Ferrari told the Times. "And when I complain the parents tell me ‘My children can do what they want&apos."

Ferrari first started adding the discount onto families&apos bills about six months ago but so far only awarded it to three families. It a grand total that he says goes to show just how rare good behavior is in his restaurant, where kids are more often found splashing water from the tap in the bathroom or running around waiters who are carrying plates to tables.

Even so, Ferrari does admit that since the implementation of the discount, he has felt a sense of calmness reenter his restaurant, which he says is incredibly important in maintaining the tranquil kind of ambiance that diners pay quite a bit to enjoy.

His reward-based approach for dealing with out-of-control young diners is quite different to tactics employed by other restaurateurs recently – namely, penalizing families for ill-mannered behavior by charging rude customers double or banning them from the establishment altogether. While it&aposs tough to say just which method is the most effective in keeping unruly behavior at bay, we&aposre hoping that giving families a little incentive will inspire better things.


Would Your Kids Be Well Behaved Enough for This Restaurant in Padua, Italy?

Good behavior at school may earn children a gold star, good behavior at home may earn kids five more minutes of playtime, but at Italian restaurateur Antonio Ferrari&aposs Padua wine bar, good behavior can knock five percent off a dinner bill. Ferrari got the idea to implement the discount, which appears on checks as a sconti bimbi educati, or "polite children discount," after dealing with a few too many ruckus-causing youngsters.

"I have seen five-year-olds put their feet on the table and four-year-olds jumping from chair to chair, while parents do nothing," Ferrari told the Times. "And when I complain the parents tell me ‘My children can do what they want&apos."

Ferrari first started adding the discount onto families&apos bills about six months ago but so far only awarded it to three families. It a grand total that he says goes to show just how rare good behavior is in his restaurant, where kids are more often found splashing water from the tap in the bathroom or running around waiters who are carrying plates to tables.

Even so, Ferrari does admit that since the implementation of the discount, he has felt a sense of calmness reenter his restaurant, which he says is incredibly important in maintaining the tranquil kind of ambiance that diners pay quite a bit to enjoy.

His reward-based approach for dealing with out-of-control young diners is quite different to tactics employed by other restaurateurs recently – namely, penalizing families for ill-mannered behavior by charging rude customers double or banning them from the establishment altogether. While it&aposs tough to say just which method is the most effective in keeping unruly behavior at bay, we&aposre hoping that giving families a little incentive will inspire better things.


Would Your Kids Be Well Behaved Enough for This Restaurant in Padua, Italy?

Good behavior at school may earn children a gold star, good behavior at home may earn kids five more minutes of playtime, but at Italian restaurateur Antonio Ferrari&aposs Padua wine bar, good behavior can knock five percent off a dinner bill. Ferrari got the idea to implement the discount, which appears on checks as a sconti bimbi educati, or "polite children discount," after dealing with a few too many ruckus-causing youngsters.

"I have seen five-year-olds put their feet on the table and four-year-olds jumping from chair to chair, while parents do nothing," Ferrari told the Times. "And when I complain the parents tell me ‘My children can do what they want&apos."

Ferrari first started adding the discount onto families&apos bills about six months ago but so far only awarded it to three families. It a grand total that he says goes to show just how rare good behavior is in his restaurant, where kids are more often found splashing water from the tap in the bathroom or running around waiters who are carrying plates to tables.

Even so, Ferrari does admit that since the implementation of the discount, he has felt a sense of calmness reenter his restaurant, which he says is incredibly important in maintaining the tranquil kind of ambiance that diners pay quite a bit to enjoy.

His reward-based approach for dealing with out-of-control young diners is quite different to tactics employed by other restaurateurs recently – namely, penalizing families for ill-mannered behavior by charging rude customers double or banning them from the establishment altogether. While it&aposs tough to say just which method is the most effective in keeping unruly behavior at bay, we&aposre hoping that giving families a little incentive will inspire better things.


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